NAMDOCK

Shipping in Africa

We examine a leading force in West Africa’s ship repair market, NAMDOCK, and uncover how it is delivering first-class service despite the disruption of COVID-19  
 
Writer: Sean Galea-Pace  |  Project Manager: Lewis Bush
 
 
NAMDOCK is recognised as a leader in the West African ship repair market, specialising in marine and industrial engineering.
 
Based in the Port of Walvis Bay, NAMDOCK is committed to offering safe, quality, reliable facilities and services, and innovative solutions to its clients. The company strives for delivering with speed and efficiency, and has a track record of consistency and reliability within Africa.
 
NAMDOCK’s stakeholders are fully engaged in the aim of a common goal – boosting its global competitiveness through sustainable organic growth whilst generating more value to all stakeholders involved. The organisation operates a highly efficient shipyard that includes three floating docks with a combined capacity of 30,000 tonnes, seven cranes, 1 x 60T floating crane, with fully equipped onsite workshops.
A brief history
NAMDOCK was founded in 2005 by the Namibian parliament for all drydock repairs and maintenance on large vessels within the Walvis Bay harbour. The business was established to support locals and create jobs while increasing employment across Namibia. It currently operates three dry docks where vessels are parked and then anchored to receive multiple repairs, from propulsion work through to carpentry. Today, the firm employs 700 staff and subcontracts work to more than 3,000 people at any one time.
 
NAMDOCK’s shareholders
Namibia Drydock and Ship Repair is a strategic, mutually beneficial partnership between the Nambian government and the private sector, which provides the international shipping and local industry with a full house capacity in all aspects of ship repair.
 
NAMPORT
In a joint collaboration in 2006, NAMPORT, Namibia’s National Port Authority, and NAMDOCK, Namibia Drydock and Ship Repair, worked together to increase Namibia’s capacity in the ship repair industry. Its primary aim is to intensify ship repair activities that could boost job creation and the economic development of Walvis Bay. As the majority shareholder in Namibia Drydock and Ship Repair, NAMPORT remains aligned with its mission to contribute to the success of its customers through continuous development of its capacities, technical competencies and motivated workplace.
 
The National Ports Authority of Namibia (NAMPORT) is a key shareholder (52.5 percent) of NAMDOCK. In this role, Namport:
• Manages the port facilities to cater for current trade needs.
• Develops the ports for future demands.
• Contributes to the competitiveness of the SADC’s region’s trade through the efficient, reliable and cost-effective supply of port services.
• Facilitates economic growth in Namibia by enabling regional development and cross-border trade.
• Promotes the Ports of Walvis Bay and Luderitz as preferred routes for sea-borne trade between SADC, Europe and the Americas.
• Assists with developing cross-border trade as the founding architects of the Walvis Bay Corridor Group.
• Minimises the impact of port operations on the natural environment by applying International Organisation Standardisation ISO 14001.
• Uplifts and support the communities in which it operates.
EBH Consortium (EBHC)
 
EBH Consortium purchased 47.5 percent minority shareholding in NAMDOCK from the DCD Group in 2018. The EBH Consortium consists of several captains of industry possessing a framework built on a sound formation of extensive years of knowledge and experience. These capabilities include:
• Marine, mining and industrial engineering.
• Marine salvaging and waste management.
• High-end steel and pipe fabrication work skills on the boiler maintenance and oil and gas industries.
• Logistics, agency, and freight clearing and forwarding.
• Specialises in the provision of repair, maintenance and operation services, fabrication and installation, upgrades and conversions to the marine, oil and gas, and industrial markets worldwide.
• Welding of hull structures, steam boiler, pressure vessel and pipelines.
• Naval architecture and new buildings.
 
Walvis Bay is Namibia’s largest commercial port and has direct access to principal shipping routes while acting as a natural gateway for international trade. 
 
Walvis Bay provides sheltered, deep water anchorage enhanced by temperate weather conditions, easy access by road and air, easy visa regime for visitors, and good telecommunications, road, and financial infrastructure. 
 
Walvis Bay provides several advantages over other Southern African ports, while being significantly closer to vast West Coast oilfields. Walvis Bay is considered a key part of the Walvis Bay Corridor Group which has made it an ideal port of entry to the leading trade route in southern Africa.
Future growth
Namibia Drydock and Ship Repairs maintain a robust competitive advantage, ranging from instant market penetration to the elimination of potential competitors through steady growth. The acquisition and consequent shareholding of shares by EBH Consortium ensures Namibia Drydock and Ship Repairs’ sustainable growth, and adds greater value for the company and its shareholders.
 
Namibia Drydock and Ship Repair has gained access to a new pool of resources which will add value to the company, as well as maximising the realisation of opportunities for further expansion. 
 
The value proposition that Namibia Drydock and Ship Repair offers its customers are well aligned with the customer focused culture that its main stakeholders cultivate and drive. 
Upon investing in research and development, innovation and skills, as well as leveraging its strategic alliances, Namibia Drydock and Ship Repair seeks to solidify its position as the ship repair firm of choice on Africa’s west coast and accelerate its international competitiveness.